Sept. 27: Ava

Thursday, Sept. 27 @ 7 pm / Galaxy Cinemas / Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Sadaf Foroughi
Iran/Canada/Qatar; 2017
Farsi with English subtitles; 103 minutes
Rating: PG

Coming of age in Iran, Ava (Mahour Jabbari) faces pressure to meet the expectations of her parents, teachers, and friends. After an act
of betrayal by her mother, Ava rebels. And when she learns that her
parents were once flagrant rule breakers themselves, her rebellious
behaviour escalates, leading to life-altering choices. Foroughi’s
masterful direction vividly renders Ava’s internal turmoil, creating
one of the strongest, most richly developed female leads seen this
year. An exquisitely composed and gripping drama.

It’s a gripping, steely performance, complex and smart in a way you don’t often seen teen girls portrayed – anywhere. Janet Smith, Georgia Straight

Foroughi’s shrewd filmmaking uses the frame to advantage: the
tightening of Ava’s constraints is matched by the mise en scène around her.
Mallory Andrews, Cinema Scope

Ava is a layered, complex character, and one that anyone who was ever a teenager can identify with. Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle

Sept. 13: The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Thursday, Sept. 13 @ 7 pm / Galaxy Cinemas / Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Desiree Akhavan
USA; 2017
English; 90 minutes
Rating: 14A

High school student Cameron Post (Chloë Grace Moretz) seems to fit in perfectly with her conservative community, until she’s caught in the back seat of a car with another girl. Cameron is shipped off to a religious conversion therapy center where she’s subjected to
outlandish discipline and “de-gaying” methods. But the center also
unexpectedly provides a community she can connect with. Through
its stellar cast and thoughtful direction, The Miseducation of Cameron
Post
tells its coming-of-age story with wit and compassion.

Chloë Grace Moretz puts in a career-best turn as a teen sent to ‘pray away the gay’ at a Christian camp in Desiree Akhavan’s compassionate LGBT story. Jordan Hoffman, The Guardian

This is a lovely, richly shaded portrait of adolescence in all its shifting moods, shot through with a melancholy sweetness and sly, intoxicating humour. Edward Lawrenson, The Big Issue

The sort of film that stays with you. Powerful in its restraint, and
unfailingly full of light.
Hannah Woodhead, Little White Lies