Mar. 21: Non-Fiction

Thursday, March 21, 2019
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Olivier Assayas
France  2019
French; 108 minutes
Rating: R for some language and sexuality/nudity

Successful and self-assured book publisher Alain (Guillaume Canet) is busy coping with the ins and outs of both his private and
professional lives. His relationship with his wife (Juliette Binoche) has gone stale, he has to deal delicately with one of his long-time
authors (Vincent Macaigne), and in his enthusiastic embrace of
digital and social media Alain has hired an ambitious young woman as the “head of digital transition”. A delicious comedy of manners, Non-Fiction probes at what lies behind the actions of its ensemble
of characters and how they are affected by the hyperconnectivity
of today.

A new treasure from one of France’s most vital filmmakers.
Jon Frosch, The Hollywood Reporter

The frame holds steadier here; it’s the churning dialogue – funny,
seductive, always carving out fresh tributaries – that propels you
forward.
Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times

Canet and Macaigne are eminently watchable, but Juliette Binoche
quietly steals every scene.
Norman Wilner, NOW Toronto

Feb. 28: The Grizzlies

Presented in partnership with Shadows of the Mind Film Festival
Feb. 23 – Mar. 3, 2019
http://www.shadowsfilmfest.com/

Thursday, February 28, 2019
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Miranda de Pencier
Canada 2018
English; 102 minutes
Rating: PG

When first-time teacher Russ Sheppard (Ben Schnetzer) moves north for a job in Kugluktuk, a town struggling with one of the
highest suicide rates in North America, he’s shocked and overwhelmed by the numerous social issues facing the youth. The
lacrosse program Russ introduces is met with skepticism and
resistance, but Russ’ commitment wins his students’ trust, and
together they form the Grizzlies lacrosse team. With stunning breakout performances by Nunavut-based actors Paul Nutarariaq and Emerald MacDonald, The Grizzlies is a testament to the spirit,
tenacity, and leadership of Inuit youth.

Bracingly unsentimental and transcendently moving at the same time. Stephen Farber, Hollywood Reporter

Working with Inuit producers and a cast studded with locals whose
confidence and spirit belie their lack of experience (…), first-time
feature director Miranda de Pencier delivers a crowd-pleasing
(if sometimes clunky) drama.
Simon Houpt, Globe and Mail

Feb. 21: Cold War

Thursday, February 21, 2019
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Pawel Pawlikowski
Poland/UK/France 2018
Polish; 88minutes
Rating: 14a for some sexual content, nudity, and language

Wiktor (Tomasz Kot) is a jazz-loving pianist and musical director
auditioning folk musicians as part of a state-sponsored project to champion culture from rural Poland. Zula (Joanna Kulig), who turns out to be more torch singer than folk singer, captivates Wiktor at first sight with her beauty and insouciance. Their story spans
borders and decades in this portrait of the complex relationship
between the doomed lovers and their country. A visual poem that
resonates all the more thanks to its striking use of choral, classical, and jazz music, Cold War is an epic and arresting love story.

Passionate, tempestuous, haunting and assured, this latest from writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski explores, as did his Oscar-winning “Ida,”
Poland’s recent past, resulting in a potent emotional story with political overtones that plays impeccably today.

Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

Its greatest strengths, though, are its two knockout leads, who give the story its heat, its flesh and its heartbreak.
Manohla Dargis, New York Times

The Polish filmmaker has conjured a dazzling, painful, universal odyssey through the human heart and all its strange compulsions. It could be the most achingly romantic film you’ll see this year, or just a really painful
reminder of the one that got away.
Phil de Semlyen, Time Out

Feb. 7: If Beale Street Could Talk

Thursday, February 7, 2019
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Barry Jenkins
USA 2018
English; 119 minutes
Rating: PG for some language and sexual content

Set in the early 1970s in the predominantly Latin American
community of East Harlem, the film follows Tish (Kiki Layne), a
19-year-old woman who falls in love with Fonny (Stephan James), a young sculptor. But their brief idyll is broken when Fonny is arrested and wrongly convicted of rape. Tish, who has just discovered she is pregnant, and her family must fight to prove Fonny’s innocence.
Preserving both the politics and romantic spirit of James Baldwin’s poignant novel, If Beale Street Could Talk is a lyrical celebration of the power of love and hope in times of despair.

This movie works as a timeless romance, a family drama, a legal thriller and a poignant social commentary. A great American novel has been turned into a great American film. Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

Like a great bluesman, Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins finds poetry in the lives of people struggling to surpass pain and cruel circumstances, often
choosing beautiful images over words.
Peter Howell, Toronto Star

You’ve never seen romantic love depicted on screen with such lyrical and gorgeous intensity, or systemic injustice brought to such vivid and
enraging life. Film classes will be taught about Jenkins’ use of color.

Glen Weldon, NPR