Nov. 1: The Wife

Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Björn Runge
UK/Sweden/USA; 2017
English; 100 minutes
Rating: 14A (for language and some sexual content)

Joe (Jonathan Pryce) and Joan (Glenn Close) Castleman appear to have a perfect marriage. They’re both delighted to hear that Joe is being given the Nobel Prize for Literature. But from the moment the couple arrives in Stockholm for the prize ceremony, tensions rise,
as the normally shy Joan is pushed uncomfortably into the spotlight where long-kept secrets are in danger of being illuminated. Focusing on unspoken agreements and long-simmering resentments, The Wife is an incisive study of celebrity, marriage, and the creative process.

[Close] is a marvel of twisty understatement here, delivering emotions that conceal as much as they reveal, and offering onion-like layers that invite repeat viewings in light of some of the film’s later revelations.
Andrew Barker, Variety

The sort of detailed, A-level film that earns a viewer’s respect for its
intelligence in a marketplace of mind-numbing hoopla.

Colin Covert, Minneapolis Star Tribune

Pryce and Close perform with and for each other, rather than the camers, in ways that go beyond mere chemistry between actors. It’s as if they are working together on a single, unified performance.
Rob Thomas, Capital Times

Oct. 25: Three Identical Strangers

Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Tim Wardle
United Kingdom; 2018
English; 96 minutes
Rating: PG

Robert Shafran arrives at college only to find that strangers
continually refer to him as “Eddy”. When Robert meets Eddy
Galland, their incredible story is picked up by the media, catching
the attention of David Kellman, their identical triplet. With the three brothers happily reunited, their parents start to investigate what
separated the young men in the first place, and uncover a conspiracy
with an unknown number of victims affected. A documentary of
triumph and tragedy, Three Identical Strangers leads its audience
through an emotional journey about how we understand our
families and ourselves.

A gripping, stranger-than-fiction account of a real-world medical
conspiracy, the film begins as a human-interest story and builds to an
impressive work of investigative journalism into how and why they were placed with the families who raised them.
Peter Debruge, Variety

Tim Wardle’s documentary contains as many twists as a great thriller. Bill Goodykoontz, Arizona Republic

Blending excellent reporting and strong storytelling, this is a disturbing film truly stranger than fiction. Colin Covert, Minneapolis Star Tribune

Oct. 11: Leave No Trace

Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018
7 pm @ Galaxy Cinemas, Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Debra Granik
USA; 2018
English; 109 minutes
Rating: PG

Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie), and her veteran father, Will (Ben Foster), have lived undetected for years in Forest Park, a vast woods on the edge of Portland, Oregon. A chance encounter leads to their discovery and removal from the park and into the care of a social services agency. There they must confront their conflicting desire to be part of a community and fierce need to live apart. A haunting film, Leave No Trace is a moody, mysterious, mesmerizing exploration of an unexpected existence on the edge.

Once again, Granik introduces us to a kind of family that cinema rarely captures believably, and she does so with a style that’s both lyrical and realistic at the same time, anchored by a pair of unforgettable
performances.
Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com

It covers difficult ground, but to say it leaves no trace would be a lie. It definitely makes its mark. Adam Graham, Detroit News

Debra Granik made a stunning feature eight years ago: Winter’s Bone, … Here’s another stunner, and another revelation in the calmly radiant
person of Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie.
Joe Morgenstern,
Wall Street Journal