April 5: The Divine Order

Thursday, Apr. 5 @ 7 pm / Galaxy Cinemas / Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Petra Volpe
Switzerland; 2017
German with English subtitles; 96 minutes
Rating: 14A

In 1971 Swiss women didn’t have the right to vote and couldn’t
get a job without their husband’s permission. Frustrated by her
dependence on her husband Hans (Maximilian Simonischek), and
the decisions being made by the men in her life, quiet Nora (Marie
Leuenberger) gets involved in the budding women’s movement.
As the women in her small town gradually dare to take more control
over their lives, opposition to their stance mounts. Filled with gentle
humour, The Divine Order offers an uplifting story of grassroots
community activism set on a foundation of friendship and support.

The Divine Order radiates an infectious admiration for the courage shown by its heroines in the face of immense obstacles.
Nick Schager, Variety

Petra Volpe’s direction is crisp, her screenplay is smart and well-paced, and the acting is superb. Paul Weissman, Film-Forward

Leuenberger brings a vulnerability and defiance to Nora that elevates the film past dogma or sentimentality. Tom Long, Detroit News

April 19: The House by the Sea

Thursday, Apr. 19 @ 7 pm / Galaxy Cinemas / Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Robert Guédiguian
France; 2017
French with English subtitles; 107 minutes

In this tragic tale of family discord, three adult siblings, Angèle
(Ariane Ascaride), Joseph (Jean-Pierre Darroussin), and Armand (Gérard Meylan), gather at their childhood home to attend to their father (Fred Ulysse) who has suffered a debilitating stroke. After years apart, the siblings reflect on who they’ve become and what they’ve inherited. A rich tapestry of culture, the film examines how the local relates to the global and what it means to live life based on values. One of the peaks in Guédiguian’s illustrious career, the House by the Sea is a mournful tribute to a fading lifestyle.

The House by the Sea feels like the work of a filmmaker gazing back over his own filmography as one might across a sparkling blue sea, and observing its tides. Jessica Klang, Variety

March 22: Call me by your name

Thursday, Mar. 22 @ 7 pm / Galaxy Cinemas / Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Director: Luca Guadagnino
Italy/France/Brazil; 2017
English/Italian/French/German with English subtitles; 130 minutes
Rating: R for sexual content, nudity and some language

In this Oscar-nominated film, 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is spending the summer at a beautiful Italian villa with his translator mother (Amira Casar) and Greco-Roman professor father (Michael Stuhlbar). Each summer, his father takes on an academic assistant. This year’s guest, Oliver (Armie Hammer), resembles the Greek
statues he studies and it’s not long before an attraction simmers
between the young adult and the graduate student. Offering ripe,
glowing  visual details, Call Me by Your Name drenches us with  the
golden heat of a Northern Italian summer in this sensual

Even as he beguiles us with mystery, Guadagnino recreates Elio’s life-changing summer with such intensity that we might as well be
experiencing it first-hand. It’s a rare gift that earns him a place in the
pantheon alongside such masters of sensuality as Pedro Amodóvar and François Ozon.
Peter Debruge, Variety

The direction by Luca Guadagnino is reminiscent of Bertolucci’s
sensitivity at its best, the fabulous cinematography by Sayombhu
Mukdeeprom rapturously captures the rich work of art that is Italy in
summer, and the actors are to die for.
Rex Reed, New York Observer

One of the very best films of the year. Guadagnino, a master cinema
sensualist, and his award-caliber actors Chalamet, Hammer and Stuhlbarg create a love story for the ages and a new film classic.

Peter Travers, Rolling Stone