Mar. 30: Paterson

Thursday Mar. 30 @ 7:00 pm / GALAXY CINEMAS / Sault Ste. Marie

Director: Jim Jarmusch
USA 2016
English / 118 minutes
Rating: R (for some language)

Paterson (Adam Driver) works as a bus driver in Paterson, New
Jersey and his life is a repetitive routine. His wife Laura (Golshifteh Farahani), as even-tempered as her husband, is a perfect match. They’re just an ordinary couple in an ordinary small city. But there’s more beneath the surface of these two. Each morning Paterson scrawls a poem in his notebook, and each evening Laura welcomes him home with a new and quirky surprise. An offbeat meditation on the couple’s desire for creative self-expression, Paterson is a
rewarding slow burn of a film.

Paterson’s life sounds like it would be pretty dull to live through, let alone watch in a movie. But in writer-director Jim Jarmusch’s hands, Paterson becomes a fascinating and enthralling film that finds magic in the
mundane.
Rob Thomas, Capital Times (Madison, WI)

The different Patersons combine into a terrific take on love’s abiding worth, the mechanics of creativity and the strength of community. The film has Jarmusch’s trademark deadpan deliberation, but it’s also
possessed of a great and genuine heart.
Craig Mathieson, The Sunday Age

Poetry is about taking the realities of your life and the complexities of your mind and heart and transforming them into something beautiful and pure, and that’s exactly what Jarmusch does with Paterson. It’s
lovely stuff.
Daniel Barnes, Sacramento News & Review 

Mar. 9: Forushande / The Salesman

Thursday Mar. 9 @ 7:00 pm / GALAXY CINEMAS / Sault Ste. Marie

Director: Asghar Farhadi
Iran/France 2016
Persian with English subtitles / 125 minutes
Rating: PG-13 (for mature thematic elements and a brief bloody
image)

After an unfriendly visit leads to an eruption of violence, things turn strange and tense between a husband and wife. Feeling vengeful and confused, Emad (Shahab Hosseini) plays detective, while rattled Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti) gives him mysteriously mixed signals. Meanwhile, the two are performing in an amateur production of Death of a Salesman, and their onstage roles begin to resonate with their fractured lives in beguiling ways. Farhadi’s control is evident as he draws us in, turns the screws, and leaves us breathless in this work of slow-burning suspense.

Hosseini and Alidoosti are superb, with rich internal lives that give depth to their characters’ actions – and these characters are indeed active. Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle 

Using handheld camera and a minimum of dialogue and music, Farhadi turns the mundane into the momentous. Peter Howell, Toronto Star

It’s clear by now the Iranian director is something of a master, from whom every narrative filmmaker should take a crash course in complex and resonant storytelling. Michael Atkinson, In These Times 

Mar. 2: Manchester by the Sea

Thursday Mar. 2 @ 7:00 pm / GALAXY CINEMAS / Sault Ste. Marie

Presented in partnership with Shadows of the Mind Film Festival
Feb. 27 – Mar. 5, 2017
http://www.shadowsfilmfest.com/

Director: Kenneth Lonergan
USA 2016
English / 136 minutes
Rating: R (for language throughout and some sexual content)

After the death of his older brother Joe (Kyle Chandler), Lee (Casey Affleck), a reclusive handyman in Boston, is shocked to learn he’s been appointed legal guardian of his nephew, Patrick (Lucas
Hedges). Lee reluctantly returns to his hometown where he is forced to confront his past while he deals with the realities of the present. In stark contrast to his uncle, Patrick is full of life and the two
struggle to adjust to a world without the man who held their family together. Filled with authenticity and honesty, Manchester by the Sea is a deeply empathetic story of loss and human connection.

It’s Affleck’s movie to quietly own as layer upon layer of Irish impassivity is stripped away from his visage until the unspeakable can be spoken. Matthew Lickona, San Diego Reader

The sadness of “Manchester by the Sea” is the kind of sadness that makes you feel more alive, rather than less, to the preciousness of things.
Ty Burr, Boston Globe

Miraculously, this lengthy, achingly sad story is very entertaining and leaves you wanting more. An undercurrent of dry humour makes its way into even the most tragic of sequences.
Nick Dent, Daily Telegraph, Australia